Educational Affairs

Educational Affairs

The University of Illinois College of Medicine will be introducing our new curriculum to entering medical students in August 2017, at our Rockford, Peoria and Chicago campuses. 

 


College-Wide Retreat Accelerates Plans for Curriculum Renewal;

Accrediting Body Approves Plans for M1 Expansion to Peoria and Rockford


Over 120 faculty, students and staff from all four present campuses attended a curriculum retreat in February 2016, where options for curricular structures and content were discussed and further elaborated by small working groups. The College Committee on Instruction and Appraisal subsequently adopted several recommendations regarding the overall curricular structure and content, now in the process of formal approvals through the College of Medicine and University Faculty Senate. Details of these latest recommendations can be found once you click below in the section entitled "From the Retreat: Integrated Coursework, Organized into Five Thematic Content Areas."

Also in February, the College received approval from the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME) to proceed with plans to offer the entire M1 through M4 curriculum in Peoria and Rockford, beginning in 2017. This expansion is an integral component of the broader curriculum renewal project, as is further explained in the text below. Such approval must be obtained from the LCME, recognized by the US Department of Education and the World Federation on Medical Education as the authority for the accreditation of medical education programs leading to the MD degree in the United States and Canada, prior to embarking on the expansion of programs at branch campuses or major curriculum change.

To read more click here!

Please check back soon for updates to this page!

Please check back soon for updates to this page!

A current educational planning initiative is our partnership with the AAMC on the Initiative to develop a set of Core Entrustable Professional Activities.


The AAMC published new guidelines in May 2014 to provide expectations for both learners and teachers that include 13 activities that all medical students should be able to perform upon entering residency, regardless of their future career specialty. The guidelines are based on emerging literature documenting a performance gap at the transition point between medical school and residency training. Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) were chosen as the framework for the guide because they offer a practical approach to assessing competence in real-world settings and impact both learners and patients.

Click the following link for more information on AAMC Core EPAs.