Internal Medicine-Pediatrics (MedPeds)

Welcome to the Department of Internal Medicine-Pediatrics (MedPeds) Resource Page. This online repository houses relevant resources and contact information for students seeking career advice. We encourage you to review the career-related materials provided (e.g. Specialty Webinar, Interview Questions, Research, etc.) as you seek support in your journey through medical school. If you have further questions that are not addressed on this page, please feel free to contact a Specialty Faculty Mentor for further guidance.

MATCH PREPARATION AND CHARTING OUTCOMES

You are more than your Step Scores!  Use this NRMP page to explain HERE  and to interactively explore your specialty of interest,  based on your own experiences, educational attainment, and scholarship HERE.

Away rotations are not required for Med-Peds applicants. We advise our students interested in Med-Peds to undertake an away for 3 reasons: 1) If they want to experience a different type of program than their home program (e.g. a larger center, a smaller center, a community based program etc.); 2) If they want to undertake an audition rotation at a site they are highly interested in Matching to get better knowledge of that program; and 3) If they want to rotate in a particular rotation that isn’t available at their home program or a particular part of the country.

Research is encouraged but not required for Med-Peds. Scholastic activity of any kind (poster, platform presentation, Quality Improvement Projects, research project) shows you participated in academic endeavors during medical school, and is a great sign for a Program Director that you will do the same in residency. Advanced research isn’t a requirement in our field to be competitive as an applicant, but scholastic activity is always welcome and a great discussion topic for Program Directors on interview day.

Number of letters recommended – 3-4

Chair’s letter/SLOE/special letter required? Chair letter is optimal but not required for students who do not have access to a traditional academic Chair

Number of letters from within specialty? None required, some centers do not have Med-Peds physicians.

Number of letters from away rotations/institutions? None required

Do you require the MSPE before offering interviews? No

We do not require any special letter of recommendation (e.g. SLOE letters or away rotation letters). We want to see letters of recommendation from physician’s with whom you have worked and can provide background of your skillset and qualities as a physician in training. Ideally, the physicians serving as a referral from you should know your career goals and able to speak to how you will perform in a clinical training setting. The content and quality of the letter from someone who knows you and your background and career goals means more than the type of setting in which it was acquired.

Personal statements should describe what attracts you to the field of Med-Peds and why you have chosen it for residency. It should be brief, and doesn’t need to contain a “eureka” moment or a life-altering story. If those types of experiences occurred then share them, but it is also ok and encouraged to give a synopsis of why you feel drawn to the field and why it speaks to you as an individual. If you have any red flags on your application (e.g a failed step exam, a remediated class or clerkship etc.). Be honest about why the red flag occurred –most program directors do not expect perfection from applicants, but honesty will go a long way towards making a red flag less concerning to a Program Director.

When do programs in your specialty generally begin reviewing applications? When ERAS opens.

When do programs in your specialty begin offering interviews? Before MSPE is released, usually within a few days of ERAS opening

When does your program generally offer interviews? Beginning in early-mid October to the end of December

Do you require the MSPE before offering interviews? No

An interview day is a chance for the program to meet you, and you to meet the program –the Program Director, the Program Coordinator, Core faculty, potential fellow residents etc. Be yourself –Program Directors and program staff and residents are looking most of all to see if you fit into the culture and the environment of their program (e.g. the people, the city, the hospital etc). They will try to get to know you in the time you during the interview to try and assess what you are looking for in a program. For example, if the hospital is in a large city, and you state in your Personal Statement and interviews that you are a small city person, they will want to know what led you to apply to their program.

Remember, you are interviewing them just as much as they are interviewing you. How do you get along with the Program Director, what was the city like, did the Program Coordinator seem welcoming, is there a sense of camaraderie among the residents? You will be training there for 4 years, so you want to try and get a sense of the city and hospital you are potentially going to be moving to.
How many programs to apply to depends on the applicant and their level of competitiveness for Med-Peds residency. We recommend talking to academic advisors and Med-Peds Program Directors and faculty for advice on how many programs to apply to. Because there are fewer programs in the country some students choose to dual apply. Discuss this with your local advisors and if possible Med-Peds faculty prior to dual applying.

We advise students not to feel the need to contact us post interview. There is enough stress in the application season as it is, wondering if you should send a thank you card or tell someone they are your number one shouldn’t be one of those stressors. The interview day is thank you enough and we advise students to not feel the need to reach out. However, we also advise if any questions arise or there are specifics the student wants to know about the program to absolutely reach out with any questions, concerns etc. We want students to feel like they can access us for questions at any time before or after their interview. We don’t want them to feel obligated to contact us to let us know their interest level. If a student has an update to share that they want us to know about their application, or a piece of information that wasn’t available on interview day or something that a student genuinely wants us to know, we certainly encourage them to reach out to us as well. Conversely, however, we follow NRMP guidelines strictly and won’t share any leading information or tell a student where they will be ranked on our list, as such claims are often false and misleading to a student when they are made.

  1. The NRMP publishes a survey of Applicants each year. This report presents the results of selected items from the 2019 NRMP Applicant Survey. The report documents factors that applicants weigh in selecting programs (1) at which to interview and (2) to rank in the Main Residency Match. It can be found HERE.
  2. The NRMP Publishes a survey of Residency Program Directors. This report examines the factors program directors use to select applicants to interview and rank. Data are reported for 22 specialties and the transitional year in the Main Residency Match. It can be found HERE.
  3. Looking for residency programs?  The AAMC interactive, Careers in Medicine Website is where you should be! LINK
  4. Having difficulty deciphering this information?  Contact your Student Affairs Career Advisor on your campus!!!

MATCH PREPARATION AND CHARTING OUTCOMES

You are more than your Step Scores!  Use this NRMP page to explain HERE  and to interactively explore your specialty of interest,  based on your own experiences, educational attainment, and scholarship HERE.

It is up to the individual applicant. Away rotations are not required or expected. However, they may be appropriate or helpful for an applicant with a specific interest or circumstance (i.e. geographic restrictions, special clinical or research interest). Would recommend discussing with an advisor prior to proceeding.

It is valued and encouraged but by no means a requirement. If you did participate in research, please be prepared to discuss in detail your role, as well as, the research question, findings, and results (if available) of the project. In general, some sort of extracurricular pursuit is recommended, but it does not need to be limited to research. It can include community outreach, volunteer efforts, policy work, quality improvement, medical education, etc.

Number of letters recommended – 3-4

Chair’s letter/SLOE/special letter required? Variably department letters are required, but this is the case less and less over the years (please check program websites)

Number of letters from within specialty? Ideally 2 letters commenting on clinical performance (from a combination of medicine, pediatrics, and/or MedPeds faculty); helpful to have an additional letter of support from another clinical rotation or a research/volunteer/scholarship advisor.

Number of letters from away rotations/institutions? N/A

Do you require the MSPE before offering interviews? We will offer some inteviews prior to MSPE availability.

In general, personal statements should convey an applicant’s motivation for pursuing MedPeds training, and any goals that an applicant has about how they plan to utilize their training in the future. Personal statements are important for illustrating an applicant’s ability to communicate with clarity via writing, a very important skill for physicians. Statements should be reviewed for content, but also to ensure no grammatical or spelling errors. Overall, a personal statement generally does not have great weight, but a poorly written one can be harmful to an application.

When do programs in your specialty generally begin reviewing applications? As soon as ERAS opens.

When do programs in your specialty begin offering interviews? As soon as ERAS opens.

When does your program generally offer interviews? Usually within a week of ERAS opening to program directors, with the majority of interview offers going out by about 1-2 weeks after MSPE release. We do continue to provide interview offers throughout our recruitment season. Our interviews usually run from mid-October through about early to mid-December (each program’s schedule will be different).

Do you require the MSPE before offering interviews? Not usually
Many programs will review applications not long after ERAS opens, but some will delay application review until after MSPE’s are released. It is encouraged that students submit their applications as close to the ERAS opening date, as possible. We generally begin sending invitations to applicants within 1-2 weeks after ERAS opens to allow for any system or application errors to be corrected, more letters of recommendation to be uploaded, sufficient time for us to review applications, and in order to begin scheduling for our early interviews in mid-October. The majority of our interviews will be offered within 1-2 weeks of there lease of MSPE letters.
Having both Step I and Step II CK (ideally even CS as well) available at the time that ERAS opens is ideal (some programs require CK scores prior to offering interviews). USMLE scores will often be used as an initial screener by many programs, if both Step I and CK scores are available, then often both scores will be factored into the screening process. However, USMLE scores are only one part of the application review, and it can be overcome. Please discuss with advisors’ regarding your overall application competitiveness.
Additionally, if you have not heard from a desired program by mid-October, it is encouraged for you to reach out to their program coordinator or program director regarding the status of your application.

If you have gotten an interview, then the program considers you a viable candidate. So, relax, you have earned your spot! Interviews are generally more conversational. Applicants should be prepared to discuss any items listed on their CV in detail. They should have questions prepared that are ideally individualized to some degree to the program they are visiting. The number of interviews during an interview day will be variable, but an applicant should expect at least two interviews (usually more) when visiting a program.

The number or residency interviews that an applicant should plan for will vary. Ideally, an applicant should have 8-10 programs they are willing to rank and should plan to pursue interviews accordingly.

For our program, we do not encourage post-interview communication. This communication will not factor into our decision-making process. However, if you have a thoughtful comment you would like to share, or if you have a specific question that arises after the interview, then do feel free to contact us (email is sufficient). Of note, if you do communicate with us, unless we are answering a specific question, our response will often be fairly generic to ensure compliance with NRMP regulations.

  1. The NRMP publishes a survey of Applicants each year. This report presents the results of selected items from the 2019 NRMP Applicant Survey. The report documents factors that applicants weigh in selecting programs (1) at which to interview and (2) to rank in the Main Residency Match. It can be found HERE.
  2. The NRMP Publishes a survey of Residency Program Directors. This report examines the factors program directors use to select applicants to interview and rank. Data are reported for 22 specialties and the transitional year in the Main Residency Match. It can be found HERE.
  3. Looking for residency programs?  The AAMC interactive, Careers in Medicine Website is where you should be! LINK
  4. Having difficulty deciphering this information?  Contact your Student Affairs Career Advisor on your campus!!!

SPECIALTY FACULTY LIAISONS

Chicago

Pavan Srivastava, MD

[email protected]

Isaias Torres,Coordinator

[email protected]

Peoria

Matthew Mischler, MD

[email protected]

Specialty Webinars